Egypt parliament set to meet defying army

Egypt parliament set to meet, defying army | News , Middle East | THE DAILY STAR

egypt parliament set to meet defying army

Protests against the Egyptian coup d'état erupted in July Immediately following the removal of President Mohamed Morsi by the Egyptian Armed Forces on 3 July amid demonstrations against Morsi's . We are still in the street, we still don't know if all of the armed forces will accept what Sisi has done. CAIRO, Jul 10 - Egypt's Islamist-dominated parliament was set to convene on Egypt parliament set to convene, defying military invited members of the lower house to meet at pm ( GMT), but Egypt's highest court. Responding a day after Mohamed Mursi's decree, the army on Monday defended its action to dissolve parliament and, in an apparent swipe at.

Middle East

The military council which had run Egypt since Mubarak was toppled by popular protests in February handed powers to Mursi on June 30, but it had sought to trim his authority shortly before he took office following a June vote. It had dissolved parliament and taken legislative power for itself.

  • Egypt parliament set to meet, defying army
  • Egypt parliament set to convene, defying military
  • Egyptian revolution of 2011

Yet in a move that seemed to take even the generals by surprise, Mursi said on Sunday he was recalling parliament and would hold an election once a constitution was in place, meaning the parliament would not serve a full four-year term. The row is part of a broader power struggle which could take years to play out, pitting long suppressed Islamists against generals whose fellow officers ran Egypt for six decades and an establishment still packed with Mubarak-era officials.

Egypt parliament meets, defying army - Emirates24|7

But the immediate impact may be to make it more difficult for the president to stabilise an economy fast heading towards a balance of payments and budget crisis.

The stock market reacted to Sunday's news by plunging more than 5 percent at the open. Yet Mursi and Tantawi showed no hint of discord on Monday when the president, as he did last week, attended a military parade. Seated next to each other, Mursi and Tantawi turned to each other in a brief jovial exchange, live television images showed. And in a possible signal that the generals would not openly challenge Mursi, the state news agency reported that guards at parliament allowed some members back into the building after it had been declared off limits when the army ordered it dissolved.

Egypt parliament set to meet, defying army | Reuters

Some analysts said Mursi's decision to order early elections could offer a compromise by acknowledging the court's assertion that the election to the chamber breached some legal rules. The Supreme Constitutional Court, whose ruling led to parliament being dissolved, asserted that its decisions were final and binding, in a statement issued after the court met in emergency session in response to Mursi's decree.

The court also said it would review cases challenging the constitutionality of Mursi's decree on Tuesday. But the Brotherhood played down the row. Some analysts said Mursi's decision to order early elections could offer a compromise by acknowledging the court's assertion that the election to the chamber breached some legal rules.

Post-coup unrest in Egypt (2013–2014)

One European diplomatic source said recalling parliament gave Mursi leverage over the military, but could also placate Islamists who dominate the assembly so that Mursi would have a freer hand to pick a broader cabinet with non-Islamist members. In a further sign the generals may not challenge Mursi head on, the state news agency reported that guards at parliament had allowed some members into the building on Monday. It had been declared off limits when the army ordered the chamber dissolved.

The generals had also met late on Sunday to discuss Mursi's decree but did not release a statement afterwards. The military council has less formal room for manoeuvre now that it has transferred presidential powers to Mursi, even if it has removed some powers from that office.

egypt parliament set to meet defying army

Quoted by the state news agency on Monday, Saad al-Katatni, who like President Mohamed Mursi hails from the long-suppressed Muslim Brotherhood, said the lower house would sit from noon GMT on Tuesday, overturning a court judgment and military order issued a month ago, before Mursi's election. The move, heralded by a decree issued by Mursi on Sunday, barely a week after he took office, threatens Egypt with fresh political uncertainty likely to take a toll on a fragile economy and dash the hopes of many desperate for a period of calm after 17 turbulent months since the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak, Reuters reports.

Morsi rejects Army's ultimatum

However, in a signal that relations have far from broken down between Mursi and the army, the president and the head of the military council appeared together, looking relaxed and in conversation, at a televised event on Monday morning. The military council which had run Egypt since Mubarak was toppled by popular protests in February handed powers to Mursi on June 30, but it had sought to trim his authority shortly before he took office following a June vote.

egypt parliament set to meet defying army

It had dissolved parliament and taken legislative power for itself. Yet in a move that seemed to take even the generals by surprise, Mursi said on Sunday he was recalling parliament and would hold an election once a constitution was in place, meaning the parliament would not serve a full four-year term.

The row is part of a broader power struggle which could take years to play out, pitting long suppressed Islamists against generals whose fellow officers ran Egypt for six decades and an establishment still packed with Mubarak-era officials.

But the immediate impact may be to make it more difficult for the president to stabilise an economy fast heading towards a balance of payments and budget crisis. The stock market reacted to Sunday's news by plunging more than 5 percent at the open. Yet Mursi and Tantawi showed no hint of discord on Monday when the president, as he did last week, attended a military parade.